Skip to content

Skating on thin ... plastic?

Click thumbnail for high-resolution image

Polar Rink press shot at night 1.jpg

Skaters at the Polar Rink at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The "ice" isn't ice at all. It's synthetic, which means it never melts and needs no electricity to stay frozen. (Photo courtesy of AMNH/D. Finnin)

Polar Rink press shot at night 2.jpg

Skaters at the Polar Rink at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The "ice" isn't ice at all. It's synthetic, which means it never melts and needs no electricity to stay frozen. (Photo courtesy of AMNH/D. Finnin)

IMG_5879.JPG

From left: Anja Pahl, Aaron Weinblatt, Bennet Roberts, Julia Weinblatt and Bruce Roberts spend the afternoon skating on the synthetic Polar Rink at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City in February. (Photo by Jill Colvin/CNS)

IMG_5886.JPG

From left: Bennet Roberts, 6, Julia Weinblatt, 7, Anja Pahl and Bruce Roberts spend the afternoon skating on the synthetic ice at the American Museum of Natural History's Polar Rink in New York City. (Photo by Jill Colvin/CNS)

IMG_5895.JPG

Shari Bergman, 7, skates on the synthetic ice at the American Museum of Natural History's Polar Rink in New York City in February. (Photo by Jill Colvin/CNS)

Click for text-only story

Forget skating on ice. How about skating on plastic? Throughout the country, new-generation synthetic-ice rinks are becoming increasingly popular. They’re cheaper and environmentally friendly and can be used year-round, manufacturers say. But skaters have given the new surface a chilly reception.


back