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Advertising 2.0: The rise of the flat screen

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Flat screens like this one are popping up in malls all over the country. This flat screen runs ads displaying the top 10 sales in the mall. (Courtesy of Adspace Networks)

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A new flat screen displays in-house ads and entertainment content as customers wait online at Milano Market in New York City. (By Sarah N. Lynch)

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Flat screens like this one are popping up in malls all over the country. This flat screen runs ads displaying the top 10 sales in the mall. (Courtesy of Adspace Networks)

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A new flat screen runs in house ads and other entertainment content at the Black Bear Saloon in Stamford, Conn. (By Sarah N. Lynch)

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Flat screens like this one are popping up in malls all over the country. This flat screen runs ads displaying the top 10 sales in the mall. (Courtesy of Adspace Networks)

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A new flat screen that advertises specials and entertains customers hangs above the counter at Milano Market in New York City. (By Sarah N. Lynch)

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Spurred by the low cost of the flat screen technology and the continuing decline of newspaper circulations, many companies are now turning to digital flat screens as a new and more creative way to reach a larger group of customers at the time it matters most--when they are about to take out their wallets. Although the digital advertising industry is still relatively young, the medium has been rapidly growing – and it's not just limited to the big chain stores. More and more, flat screen advertising is creeping into the corner deli or the local pub. However, it’s still too early to tell whether the signs are having an impact, say businesses piloting the screens. And consumers seem to have mixed feelings about it, too.


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