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Home cooking hits the back burner, but food culture heats up

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Abigail Hitchcock, the chef and owner of CAMAJE, shows Katrina Gleich how to properly cut a mango during a cooking class at her New York City bistro. (Photo by Karsten Moran)

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Abigail Hitchcock, the chef and owner of CAMAJE, demonstrates the technique for cutting an onion during a cooking class in her New York City bistro. (Photo by Karsten Moran)

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Katrina Gleich stirs the filling for potato and spinach samosas during a cooking class at CAMAJE, a New York City bistro. (Photo by Karsten Moran)

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Mike Shur folds potato and spinach samosas during a cooking class at CAMAJE, a New York City bistro. (Photo by Karsten Moran)

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Curried peas and cumin potatoes cook on the stovetop at CAMAJE, a New York City bistro. (Photo by Karsten Moran)

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While books about food are flying off the shelves and cooking shows are hot, people are increasingly relying on their microwaves to make dinner. Cooking is becoming more recreational and less a necessity.


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