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Explorers go to the ends of the earth, just to broadcast the experience back home

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Will Steger, UST graduate and Arctic explorer, at his cabin near Ely, Minn., Aug. 26, 2004

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In 2007 Will Steger came out of semi-retirement to lead young leaders on a trip through Baffin Island, the first of two expeditions dedicated to issues surrounding global warming. (Photo courtesy of the Will Steger Foundation)

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In 2007 Will Steger came out of semi-retirement to lead young leaders on a trip through Baffin Island, the first of two expeditions dedicated to issues surrounding global warming. (courtesy of the Will Steger Foundation)

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In 2007 Will Steger, pictured here with his dog sled on the Clyde River in Nunavut, Canada, came out of semi-retirement to lead young leaders on a trip through Baffin Island, the first of two expeditions dedicated to issues surrounding global warming. (Photo courtesy of the Will Steger Foundation)

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In 2007 Will Steger came out of semi-retirement to lead young leaders on a trip through Baffin Island, Canada, the first of two expeditions dedicated to issues surrounding global warming. (Photo courtesy of the Will Steger Foundation)

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Solitary expeditions to the ends of the earth--those glorified by Shackleton, Peary, and Sir Edmund Hillary--are being replaced by interactive trips built around streaming video, blog updates and Internet sites that document every trial, travail and observation of a new generation of explorers.


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