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Can catgirls, ninjas and giant robots save the troubled U.S. anime industry?

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The anime series "Black Blood Brothers" stars a pair of 'old-blood' vampires who defend the human race from an evil mutant vampire sect. The episodes will be available to purchase online when the series is released on Feb 26. (Courtesy of FUNimation Entertain)

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In "Emma: A Victorian Romance", a poor young maid in 19th-century London falls in love with a man far out of her reach, a wealthy nobleman named William. "Emma" is being released with subtitles only to reduce the cost and delay of dubbing. (Courtesy of Right Stuf, Inc.)

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In "Emma: A Victorian Romance", a poor young maid in 19th-century London falls in love with a man far out of her reach, a wealthy nobleman named William. "Emma" is being released with subtitles only to reduce the cost and delay of dubbing. (Courtesy of Right Stuf, Inc.)

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Drastic declines in DVD sales--from $550 million to $350 million in 4 years--mean trouble for the U.S. anime industry. One major distributor has collapsed, another is showing stress fractures, and the industry blames its fans for piracy.


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