Skip to content

Graffiti artists paint the town green

Click thumbnail for high-resolution image

jk_moss_graffiti_11.jpg

Street artist Edina Tokodi puts up two polar bear figures in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. She forms the shapes at home from small sheets of moss before hitting the streets. (Photo courtesy of Edina Tokodi)

jk_moss_graffiti_02.jpg

Street artist Edina Tokodi "tags" a construction site in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with animal moss figures. She works with familiar animal shapes to encourage passers-by to stop and touch them. (Photo courtesy of Edina Tokodi)

jk_moss_graffiti_01.jpg

Street artist Edina Tokodi "tags" a construction site in Coney Island, Brooklyn, with a deer head made of moss. She chooses environments that she feels need green reminders. (Photo courtesy of Edina Tokodi)

jk_moss_graffiti_06.jpg

Jesse Graves, a student at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, puts up his mud stencils around campus. Here, he chooses a bike path as his canvas to encourage environmentally friendly forms of transportation. (Photo courtesy of Jesse Graves)

jk_moss_graffiti_10.jpg

Jesse Graves, an art education student at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, puts up his mud stencils around campus. His "Oil Water Bottle" stencil reminds people of the large quantities of oil used to make water bottles. (Photo courtesy of Jesse Graves)

Click for text-only story

While most graffiti artists search for high-tech paints to make their tags stand out forever, some are borrowing tools from Mother Nature to make a greener mark, using biodegradable markers and living materials.


back