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The ancient Irish sport of hurling catches on in America

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Dave Wiznewski, left, attempts to defend as Joe Flasher takes a shot on goal during a Denver Gaels match. The Irish sport of hurling, called the world's fastest field sport, is attracting growing numbers of Americans in Denver and elsewhere. (Courtesy of Denver Gaels)

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Ciaran Dwyer swings and scores during a Denver Gaels match. The Irish sport of hurling, called the world's fastest field sport, is attracting growing numbers of Americans in Denver and elsewhere. (Courtesy of Denver Gaels)

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Steven Gilson looks for his shot during the Milwaukee Hurling Club's semi-finals. The Irish sport hurling, called the fastest sport on grass, has attracted hundreds of Americans in Milwaukee and elsewhere. (Kristin Sullivan/Courtesy of OffCenterPhoto)

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Joel Ingbrightson, who plays for the "Milwaukee Ale House team, tries to evade an opponent during the Milwaukee Hurling Club finals. The Irish sport of hurling, called the world's fastest field sport, has attracted hundreds of Americans in Milwaukee and elsewhere. (Kristin Sullivan/Courtesy of OffCenter Photo)

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Paula Gilson splits the defense of County Clare during a co-ed Milwaukee Hurling Club match. The Irish sport hurling, called the fastest sport on grass, has attracted hundreds of Americans in Milwaukee and elsewhere. Note the American flags on the sleeves of the Claremen. (Kristin Sullivan/Courtesy of Off Center Photo)

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Americans are falling for hurling, a tough game from Ireland, a cross between field hockey and lacrosse that's considered the fastest field sport in the world.


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