Skip to content

Far from home, U.S. students from the Republic of Georgia struggle to preserve their revolution

Click thumbnail for high-resolution image

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\001_Wendle-roserevolution.jpg

Irena Javakhadze prays at St. Nino's Georgian Orthodox Church in Brooklyn, New York. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\002_Wendle-roserevolution1.jpg

Irena Javakhadze praying at St. Nino's Georgian Orthodox Church in Brooklyn, New York. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\003_Wendle-roserevolution1.jpg

Irena Javakhadze at St. Nino's Georgian Orthodox Church in Brooklyn, New York. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\004_Wendle-roserevolution1.jpg

Irena Javakhadze at St. Nino's Georgian Orthodox Church in Brooklyn, New York. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\005_Wendle-roserevolution.jpg

Irakli Porchikidze doing his statistics homework at the Lehman Library in the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

C:\Documents and Settings\John\Desktop\To send out\006_Wendle-roserevolution.jpg

Irakli Porchikidze doing his statistics homework at the Lehman Library in the School for International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. (John Wendle/Columbia News Servic)

Click for text-only story

Coming from the tradition and Christian Republic of Georgia, some of the young people who led the Rose Revolution in 2003, now suffer through a crisis of faith so far away from home.


back