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Activists use knitting needles to make their point

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In her new project, Stitch for Senate, Catherine Mazza, founder of microRevolt, is sending knitted helmet liners to U.S. senators. American women used to knit helmet liners for soldiers on the front during World War II. (Catherine Mazza, microRevolt)

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In 2006, Danish artist Marianne Joergensen stitched a pink blanket over a combat tank to protest Denmark's involvement in the Iraq war. With volunteers contributing nearly 4000 knitted squares, the power of the piece is in people coming together to send a common message, Joergensen explains. (Barbara Katzin / Courtesy of Marianne Joergensen)

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In 2005, pro choice activists planned to litter the steps of the Supreme Court with knitted wombs to protest the court's conservative bent. The organizing effort fell through, and donated wombs ended up in the Alternative Fiber art show in Ohio instead. (M.K. Carroll)

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Catherine Mazza, founder of microRevolt, displays her last group effort - a massive Nike blanket - in her studio in Troy, New York. Knitters contributed to the project to protest Nike's use of sweatshop labor. Mazza hopes to send the blanket to Nike's CEO this summer. (Catherine Mazza, microRevolt)

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The Revolutionary Knitting Circle of Calgary knitted a banner with the message Peace Knits to carry in various protest marches. According to founder Grant Neufeld, being able to knit has opened up activism for many of his members. (Grant Neufeld)

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Catherine Mazza, founder of microRevolt, teaches a knitting workshop at the Grassroots Media Conference in Manhattan. Mazza hopes her work will show new knitters that there are a variety of mediums activists use to get their message across. (Marco Deseriis)

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Knitters have donated more than 45,000 blue squares to WaterAid's Knit A River campaign. Organizers estimate the final product will be taller than the Empire State Building. (Courtesy of WaterAid)

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In 2005, pro choice activists planned to litter the steps of the Supreme Court with knitted wombs to protest the court's conservative bent. The organizing effort fell through, and donated wombs ended up in the Alternative Fiber art show in Ohio instead. (M.K. Carroll)

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Political activists are using a new medium to get their point across: knitting. Handmade "petitions" are making political statements about everything from abortion to the Iraq war.


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