Skip to content

Restless legs syndrome keeps millions awake at night

Click thumbnail for high-resolution image

CNS_RestlessLeg_csv_016.JPG

64-year old Martin Atkins calls himself a "nightwalker," since he spends most late nights pacing his building's basement in Roosevelt Island, New York, to avoid a Restless Leg Syndrome attack. (Cassandra Vinograd/CNS)

CNS_RestlessLeg_csv_025.JPG

Martin Atkins, a New York native who has suffered from RLS since he was a child, resorts to late night walks around Roosevelt Island to avoid RLS attacks. (Cassandra Vinograd/CNS)

CNS_RestlessLeg_csv_028.JPG

When RLS keeps him awake, Martin Atkins takes late night walks around Roosevelt Island before heading home and dosing up on pain medication to fall asleep. (Cassandra Vinograd/CNS)

CNS_RestlessLeg_csv_001.JPG

64-year old Martin Atkins calls himself a "nightwalker," since he spends most late nights pacing his building's basement in Roosevelt Island, New York, to avoid a Restless Leg Syndrome attack. (Cassandra Vinograd/CNS)

Click for text-only story

Every evening, as the day winds down, millions of Americans get a strange urge: to walk, to move, to wriggle. While the rest of the country sleeps, they dance in their beds. Known as restless legs syndrome, the disorder is now being studied by researchers and a gene-based diagnosis is on the horizon.


back